Posts tagged ‘evidence-based practice’

New Evidence Updates from NICE

We are pleased to inform you that the following Evidence Updates have been published

Anaphylaxis (Mar 2013) A summary of selected new evidence relevant to NICE clinical guideline 134 ‘Anaphylaxis: assessment to confirm an anaphylactic episode and the decision to refer after emergency treatment for a suspected anaphylactic episode’ (2011)

Caesarean section (Mar 2013) A summary of selected new evidence relevant to NICE clinical guideline 132 ‘Caesarean section’ (2011)

An Evidence Update Advisory Group, comprised of topic experts, reviewed the prioritised evidence and provided a commentary. Your help in disseminating the Evidence Update to your colleagues would be much appreciated.

NICE Evidence Updates help to reduce the need for individuals, managers and commissioners to search for new evidence, and keep health and social care professionals up-to-date with new research. While Evidence Updates do not replace current accredited guidance and do not provide formal recommendations, they do highlight new evidence that health and social care professionals may wish to consider alongside current guidance.

You can browse all published Evidence Updates by date on the NHS Evidence website

NHS Evidence would also welcome your feedback on the Evidence Updates, what you like about them and how you think they could be improved. You can send your comments through to contactus@evidence.nhs.uk.

April 4, 2013 at 2:12 pm Leave a comment

BMJ Best Practice

Our London-wide access to BMJ Best Practice (via NHS Athens) is due to finish on 31st March (Easter Day), though access will continue to be available until 30th April while discussions with BMJ Group continue to take place.

To inform next steps and to enable BMJ to get some feedback on our 12 month trial, they have put together a short survey which is available at the following weblink:

” target=”_blank”>https://bmj.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_eUKnj9npdmCwz0F

If you have used BMJ Best Practice over the past year, it would be really useful if you could take a few moments to complete the survey.

If you haven’t used Best Practice for a while it is available at http://bestpractice.bmj.com/best-practice/welcome.html or click on the image below. You will need your NHS Athens username and password to sign in.

logo-best-practice-home

March 28, 2013 at 4:25 pm Leave a comment

New Evidence Updates from NICE

We are pleased to inform you that the following Evidence Updates have been published

Hypertension (Mar 2013)
The new Evidence Update focuses on a summary of selected new evidence relevant to NICE clinical guideline 130 ‘Management of hyperglycaemia in acute coronary syndromes’ (2011).

Common mental health disorders (Mar 2013)
A summary of selected new evidence relevant to NICE clinical guideline 123 ‘Common mental health disorders: identification and pathways to care’ (2011)

An Evidence Update Advisory Group, comprised of topic experts, reviewed the prioritised evidence and provided a commentary.
Your help in disseminating the Evidence Update to your colleagues would be much appreciated.

NICE Evidence Updates help to reduce the need for individuals, managers and commissioners to search for new evidence, and keep health and social care professionals up-to-date with new research. While Evidence Updates do not replace current accredited guidance and do not provide formal recommendations, they do highlight new evidence that health and social care professionals may wish to consider alongside current guidance.

You can browse all published Evidence Updates by date on the NHS Evidence website

NHS Evidence would also welcome your feedback on the Evidence Updates, what you like about them and how you think they could be improved. You can send your comments through to contactus@evidence.nhs.uk.

March 6, 2013 at 10:39 am Leave a comment

What’s new with Trip

Trip’s new database site is now live.  It new includes a new look, new features and some powerful new tools (including a PICO search interface).

Try out the new site at http://www.tripdatabase.com

Or watch a screencast highlighting new features at

Screenr – jrbtrip: What’s new with Trip.

October 31, 2012 at 9:35 am Leave a comment

Database Discovery: Map of Medicine

In the second of a series of posts we look at lesser known health database, Map of Medicine.

What is it and how can it help?

The Map of Medicine is more than a simple health-care database. It’s an online tool that visually organizes over 370 clinical pathways based on best evidence and best practice. Created for health professionals, by health professionals, the Map of Medicine can save you time re-inventing guidance and searching for the latest evidence to deliver on treatment targets and health-care planning. Pathways in the Map focus on the patient journey and stretch across all aspects of health or social care to facilitate co-ordination between the different sectors. The Map can be edited to reflect local practices and sign-post users to local services, e.g. giving details of how to refer for investigations and contact details local services and support groups.

What’s the topic coverage?
Over 370 pathways cover broad areas such as A&E, Medicine, Mental Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Oncology and Palliative Care, Paediatrics and Surgery.

How do I access it?
In London access is Athens password protected via the following 3 routes (you need to register with the site the first time you login):
1. Direct at http://london.mapofmedicine.com (Click on Login via Athens)
2. Click on the link to Map of Medicine on the Library’s EBH databases page
3. Login to My Athens with your Athens password and select Map of Medicine from the Local Resources tab.

How can I search Map of Medicine?

Enter a search term in the search box to find relevant pathways (Use “speech marks” to find phrases). Or use the Browse pathways A-Z list to find pathways under the broad topic headings. You can add a clinical presentation filter to further refine the search results.

How can I get more help?
Click here for a Quick Reference Guide to get you started or
contact Karen John-Pierre for more information about localizing the Map of Medicine.

October 17, 2008 at 4:27 pm Leave a comment

Database Discovery: BMJ Clinical Evidence

This is the first in a series of posts called ‘Database Discovery’ where we highlight lesser known healthcare databases. To kick off with we’ll look at BMJ Clinical Evidence.

What is it and how can it help me?

Clinical Evidence, produced by the BMJ Publishing Group provides a concise account of the current state of knowledge, ignorance, and uncertainty about the prevention and treatment of a wide range of clinical conditions based on thorough searches and appraisal of the literature. In other words, it contains a compendium of evidence on the effects of common clinical interventions, giving you rapid access to the bottom line data on the effectiveness of healthcare interventions.

What’s the topic coverage?

Clinical Evidence aims to cover common or important clinical conditions seen in primary and hospital care. To decide which conditions to cover, its producers review national data on consultation rates, morbidity, and mortality, and take advice from generalist clinicians and patient groups. To date over 250 conditions have been appraised, encompassing over 3,000 interventions.

How do I access it?
Access is Athens password protected via 3 routes:

1.Direct at http://www.clinicalevidence.com (Click on Logon in the top-right hand corner)

2.Click on the link to Clinical Evidence on the Library’s EBH databases page

3.Login to My Athens with your Athens password and select Clinical Evidence from the Other resources tab

On-site access is also available in the Library without using a password.

How can I search Clinical Evidence?
The database can be browsed or searched. To browse click on ‘Conditions’ in the horizontal menu bar to see a list of broad subjects, beneath which lie relevant reviews. To search, enter your condition or intervention in the search box on the top-right hand corner: more than one term will be automatically joined together with AND and you can search for a phrase by enclosing it in “speech marks”.

How can I get more help?
Try this User Guide or contact the library on library@sgul.ac.uk

September 15, 2008 at 3:44 pm 2 comments


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